Press Release

Parkinson’s Foundation Appoints Sean Kramer as Chief Development Officer

Tuesday, Jul 11, 2017

kramer_sean.pngNEW YORK & MIAMI – July 11, 2017 – The Parkinson’s Foundation today announced its hiring of Sean Kramer as Senior Vice President, Chief Development Officer. The noted non-profit leader will oversee fundraising initiatives for the national organization, working from its offices in New York and Miami.

For more than two decades, Kramer has led capital and leadership fundraising initiatives for numerous organizations including the Miami Cancer Institute, Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute, American Cancer Society, Florida International University, and Barry University.

“We are thrilled to bring a distinguished professional of Sean’s caliber to the Parkinson’s Foundation as part of our commitment to advance science and care for the millions of people across the globe living with the disease,” said CEO John L. Lehr. “As a natural relationship-builder who specializes in bringing together teams of experts to achieve desired objectives, Sean will bring significant value to our mission.”

Kramer received a bachelor’s degree in political science from Florida International University and master’s degree in business administration with honors from the University of Miami.

About the Parkinson's Foundation
The Parkinson's Foundation is working toward a world without Parkinson's disease. Formed by the merger of National Parkinson Foundation and the Parkinson's Disease Foundation, the mission of the Parkinson's Foundation is to invest in promising scientific research that will end Parkinson's disease and improve the lives of people with Parkinson's, and their families, through improved treatments, support and the best care. For more information, visit www.parkinsonsfoundation.org or call (800) 4PD-INFO (473-4636) or (800) 457-6676.

About Parkinson's Disease
Parkinson's disease is a progressive neurological disorder that affects nearly one million people in the US and over 10 million worldwide. Parkinson's is the second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's and is the 14th leading cause of death in the US. It is associated with a loss of motor control (e.g., shaking or tremor at rest and lack of facial expression) as well as non-motor symptoms (e.g., depression and anxiety). Although promising research is being conducted, there is currently no cure for Parkinson's disease.
                          

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Source Date: 
Tuesday, Jul 11, 2017