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Quilter Profiles

Who are the 600 individuals from around the world who made the Parkinson's Quilt?  Below are a few personal stories.  Also remember to browse the Parkinson's Quilt Book to view all panels.

 

Parkinson's Quilt by Rebecca Peyton

Rebecca Peyton
Manassas Park, VA
 
Rebecca Peyton, who has been quilting for two years, wanted to contribute to the cause that has affected several of her family members.  As a result, she chose to design and sew her panel in honor of her sister-in-law who lives with Parkinson’ disease.  The panel contains words of hope and an angel in the center, a design that represents the idea that there are angels watching over those with PD.  “I wanted to be able to make a difference in fighting a disease which has impacted my family,” Ms. Peyton said.  “I hope that my contribution to PDF’s quilt can help raise awareness about Parkinson’s and allow others to understand that we need to find a cure.”

 

 

 

Parkinson's Quilt by Larry Schneider

Larry Schneider, Jr.
Gibbsboro, NJ

 Larry Schneider, Jr. has been an artist his entire life, and after living with PD for the past 13 years, he wanted to use his talents to benefit the Parkinson’s community.  For his first panel, Mr. Schneider, 40, created a light-hearted quilt piece called “Park N Sons Martini Bar and Lounge (Always shaken, never stirred)” that reflects his optimistic attitude towards life with PD.  The panel shows a martini glass in the center, with several tulips and an illustration of a martini bar and lounge banner.

After posting pictures of his panel on Facebook and receiving an overwhelming response from family and friends, Mr. Schneider took up the challenge of making a second panel, this one answering the call for quilt pieces from musicians to be displayed at PDF’s annual gala, Bal du Printemps.  This second panel features an image of him playing bass guitar with an inspirational quote by Henry David Thoreau.  Mr. Schneider said, “With the support of friends and family, I was able to get my project off the ground. I’m an artist, so if I can provide images, quilt pieces or electronic art that will help this cause, I’ll do so.  I feel positive about anything I can do to help raise awareness about Parkinson’s disease.”

 

 

 

Parkinson's Quilt by Sharon StandishSharon Standish
Marysville, WA

Sharon Standish, 46, has lived with PD for nearly three years. 

When she came across the Parkinson’s Quilt Project on PDF’s website, she decided to put her artistic talents to work.  She set her eye on creating a detailed landscape panel with serene colors and peaceful scenery. 

After completing the first one, she took up the challenge of creating a second panel to pay tribute to her doctor, family, friends and faith.  Ms. Standish remarked, “We’re all a part of the same community. I wanted to use my talent in order to help make a difference.”

 

 

 

Parkinson's Quilt - Kim Cade Vitcenda

Kim Cade
Viroqua, WI

Kim Cade, 53, has lived with PD for six years.  While she always had enjoyed some artistic hobbies, she embraced her creative side even more after her diagnosis.  She took up crafting, knitting and quilting.  So when she learned about PDF’s Parkinson’s Quilt, she knew how she could contribute to PD awareness. 

 

 


Parkinson's Quilt - Kim Cade Vitcenda two

Her first panel, called “Where Words Fail...Music Speaks,” features a robin surrounded by musical instruments, sheet music, and music notes, representing the way she uses music to cope with speech difficulties.  Her second heralds the importance of her faith, depicting a dove and stained glass windows.  “I hope my work allows people who have PD to be more comfortable with themselves,” Ms. Cade says.  “Through my contribution to the Quilt Project, I hope I can be an example to others while making a difference in the Parkinson’s community.”