Adjust Text Size:change font sizechange font sizechange font sizechange font sizechange font sizechange font size

Featured Research

Can we predict who is at risk of facing cognitive issues in PD and address them earlier? These are the questions being pursued by Dr. Goldman of the PDF Research Center at Rush University Medical Center.

Learn More

PDF Grant Programs

Are you interested in furthering Parkinson's science? View PDF's open grant programs.

Learn More


Interest in Genetic Testing in Ashkenazi Jewish Parkinson's Disease Patients and Their Unaffected Relatives.

PDF's targeted PubMed search provides you with access to journal articles from the last 90 days that may be pertinent to Parkinson's disease research. 

Not what you're looking for? Do you need informational publications about Parkinson's targeted for people living with Parkinson's, caregivers and family members?  Please browse PDF's educational materials and programs - which are all available electronically or in print.  Order for yourself, a loved one or in bulk for your patients or support group.

J Genet Couns 2014 Aug;

Authors: Manisha Gupte, Roy N Alcalay, Helen Mejia-Santana, Deborah Raymond, Rachel Saunders-Pullman, Ernest Roos, Martha Orbe-Reily, Ming-X Tang, Anat Mirelman, Laurie Ozelius, Avi Orr-Urtreger, Lorraine Clark, Nir Giladi, Susan Bressman, Karen Marder

Our objective was to explore interest in genetic testing among Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) Parkinson's Disease (PD) cases and first-degree relatives, as genetic testing for LRRK2 G2019S is widely available. Approximately 18†% of AJ PD cases carry G2019S mutations; penetrance estimations vary between 24 and 100†% by age 80. A Genetic Attitude Questionnaire (GAQ) was administered at two New York sites to PD families unaware of LRRK2 G2019S mutation status. The association of G2019S, age, education, gender and family history of PD with desire for genetic testing (outcome) was modeled using logistic regression. One-hundred eleven PD cases and 77 relatives completed the GAQ. Both PD cases and relatives had excellent PD-specific genetic knowledge. Among PD, 32.6†% "definitely" and 41.1†% "probably" wanted testing, if offered "now." Among relatives, 23.6†% "definitely" and 36.1†% "probably" wanted testing "now." Desire for testing in relatives increased incrementally based on hypothetical risk of PD. The most important reasons for testing in probands and relatives were: if it influenced medication response, identifying no mutation, and early prevention and treatment. In logistic regression, older age was associated with less desire for testing in probands OR?=?0.921 95%CI 0.868-0.977, p?=?0.009. Both probands and relatives express interest in genetic testing, despite no link to current treatment or prevention.

PMID: 25127731 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

See More

Back to PubMed Articles