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The default mode network is disrupted in parkinson's disease with visual hallucinations.

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Hum Brain Mapp 2014 Jul;

Authors: Nailin Yao, Richard Shek-Kwan Chang, Charlton Cheung, Shirley Pang, Kui Kai Lau, John Suckling, James Rowe, Kevin Yu, Henry Ka-Fung Mak, Siew-Eng Chua, Shu Leong Ho, Grainne M McAlonan

Background: Visual hallucinations (VH) are one of the most striking nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD), and predict dementia and mortality. Aberrant default mode network (DMN) is associated with other psychoses. Here, we tested the hypothesis that DMN dysfunction contributes to VH in PD. Methods: Resting state functional data was acquired from individuals with PD with VH (PDVH) and without VH (PDnonVH), matched for levodopa drug equivalent dose, and a healthy control group (HC). Independent component analysis was used to investigate group differences in functional connectivity within the DMN. In addition, we investigated whether the functional changes associated with hallucinations were accompanied by differences in cortical thickness. Results: There were no group differences in cortical thickness but functional coactivation within components of the DMN was significantly lower in both PDVH and PDnonVH groups compared to HC. Functional coactivation within the DMN was found to be greater in PDVH group relative to PDnonVH group. Conclusion: Our study demonstrates, for the first time that, within a functionally abnormal DMN in PD, relatively higher "connectivity" is associated with VH. We postulate that aberrant connectivity in a large scale network affects sensory information processing and perception, and contributes to "positive" symptom generation in PD. Hum Brain Mapp, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

PMID: 24985056 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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