Adjust Text Size:change font sizechange font sizechange font sizechange font sizechange font sizechange font size

Featured Research

Can we predict who is at risk of facing cognitive issues in PD and address them earlier? These are the questions being pursued by Dr. Goldman of the PDF Research Center at Rush University Medical Center.

Learn More

PDF Grant Programs

Are you interested in furthering Parkinson's science? View PDF's open grant programs.

Learn More


'Neuroinflammation' differs categorically from inflammation: transcriptomes of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia and inflammatory diseases compared.

PDF's targeted PubMed search provides you with access to journal articles from the last 90 days that may be pertinent to Parkinson's disease research. 

Not what you're looking for? Do you need informational publications about Parkinson's targeted for people living with Parkinson's, caregivers and family members?  Please browse PDF's educational materials and programs - which are all available electronically or in print.  Order for yourself, a loved one or in bulk for your patients or support group.

Neurogenetics 2014 Aug; 15(3):201-12

Authors: Michaela D Filiou, Ahmed Shamsul Arefin, Pablo Moscato, Manuel B Graeber

'Neuroinflammation' has become a widely applied term in the basic and clinical neurosciences but there is no generally accepted neuropathological tissue correlate. Inflammation, which is characterized by the presence of perivascular infiltrates of cells of the adaptive immune system, is indeed seen in the central nervous system (CNS) under certain conditions. Authors who refer to microglial activation as neuroinflammation confuse this issue because autoimmune neuroinflammation serves as a synonym for multiple sclerosis, the prototypical inflammatory disease of the CNS. We have asked the question whether a data-driven, unbiased in silico approach may help to clarify the nomenclatorial confusion. Specifically, we have examined whether unsupervised analysis of microarray data obtained from human cerebral cortex of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and schizophrenia patients would reveal a degree of relatedness between these diseases and recognized inflammatory conditions including multiple sclerosis. Our results using two different data analysis methods provide strong evidence against this hypothesis demonstrating that very different sets of genes are involved. Consequently, the designations inflammation and neuroinflammation are not interchangeable. They represent different categories not only at the histophenotypic but also at the transcriptomic level. Therefore, non-autoimmune neuroinflammation remains a term in need of definition.

PMID: 24928144 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

See More

Back to PubMed Articles