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Participant Information

Diana van Nes

City:
State:
Country:
USA
Essay:

An artistic concept strikes me unexpectedly. If my conscious state is open to my subconscious, the experience can happen anywhere at any time.

Within minutes the idea becomes a finished work in my mind's eye. While this process remains unchanged, my method of creating is pared down.
I use less information to convey a concept to accommodate Parkinson's disease.

My work, despite the challenges my illness presents, is perhaps more profound, more meaningful and more joyful than ever before.

I've learned to accept what I used to consider a betrayal of my body. The act of creating has been and will always be an act of hope.

Artist's statement regarding "The American Express" painting: "The American Express" is a visual compendium of our culture based on an interpretation of the American flag. The flag is deconstructed, fragmented -- but ultimately recognizable by its iconic proportion and design. There are 276 images; their arrangement is based on the construct of the grid.

Purposefully taken from the mass media, they reflect the visual expressions of our culture as photographed, imagined or visually articulated by others. For example, it shows the decomposition of radioactive waste, the sequential movements of a spider galloping, and the Florida ballot with its dangling chad.

Each image has been in some way manipulated: by materials such as garlic skin, sand paper, raffia, wrapping paper, eggshell, a twist tie from a bread wrapper, an emery board, by graphite or pastels, by cropping, or by contextual reorientation.

There is a reproduction of a Warhol reproduction; a collage of a Rauschenberg collage. I have painted with American expressions to create a larger work -- one which mirrors our discordant, reactive, innovative, harmonic culture.

"I believe leaves of grass is no less than the journey-work of the stars." --Walt Whitman