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Mind, Mood and Body: Understanding Nonmotor Symptoms of PD

Hosted by PDF and the Michigan Parkinson Foundation
Lansing, MI
Friday, July 18, 2008

 

The second installment of Parkinson’s Science: Innovations and New Perspectives took place on Friday, July 18, 2008 in Lansing, MI in collaboration with the Michigan Parkinson Foundation. The event addresses a topic that is increasingly recognized as vital to understanding, living with and treating Parkinson’s disease - nonmotor symptoms.

Program

9:00 AM – 9:55 AM

Registration/Check-in

9:55 AM – 10:00 AM

Opening Remarks

10:00 AM – 11:00 AM

When Parkinson's Interferes with Gastrointestinal, Urological, Sexual and Other Functions
Ron Pfeiffer, M.D.
University of Tennessee Health Science Center

11:00 AM – 11:15 AM

Break

11:15 AM – 12:15 PM

Emotional and Cognitive Aspects of Parkinson’s Disease
Matthew Menza, M.D.
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

12:15 PM – 1:15 PM

LUNCH

1:15 PM – 2:55 PM

Additional Reflections on What We Know About the Nonmotor Symtoms of PD

Overview:

Peter A. LeWitt, M.D.
Henry Ford Hospital

Panel Discussion:

Doree-Ann V. Espiritu, M.D.
Henry Ford Hospital

Edwin B. George, M.D., Ph.D.
Wayne State University School of Medicine

John L. Goudreau, D.O., Ph.D.
Michigan State University

Matthew Menza, M.D.
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

Ronald F. Pfeiffer, M.D.
University of Tennessee Health Science Center

2:55 PM – 3:00 PM

Closing Remarks

 

Speaker Biographies

Keynote Speakers

Peter A. LeWitt, M.D.

Peter A. LeWitt, M.D., is Professor of Neurology at Wayne State University School of Medicine. Dr. LeWitt directs the Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorder Program at Henry Ford Health Systems and a laboratory research program investigating the mechanisms of neurological disease and early diagnostic markers. He serves on the medical staff of Henry Ford Hospital.

Dr. LeWitt’s research interests include neuroprotection and pharmacological management of Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease and of other neurodegenerative conditions and movement disorders. He has been active in clinical trials of new medications for Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. He is a steering committee member and investigator for clinical trials conducted by the Parkinson Study Group and a participant in a National Institutes of Health (NIH) research consortium on neuroprotection in Parkinson’s.

Dr. LeWitt is President of the Michigan Parkinson Foundation and President of the International Essential Tremor Foundation and has directed the National Parkinson Foundation’s Center of Excellence in Southfield, Michigan. He has served as an educator for the American Academy of Neurology and The Movement Disorder Society, where he also serves as Secretary. He has been a scientific review consultant for the NIH, the Veterans Administration, and the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research. Dr. LeWitt has also served as a consultant to many US and international pharmaceutical firms with respect to drug development and clinical trials in neurological disorders.

He is the author of more than 300 publications on clinical and basic neuroscience and in 1999 edited, Parkinson’s Disease: The Treatment Options. He also serves as Editor-in-Chief of Clinical Neuropharmacology and is a member of the editorial board of Journal of Neural Transmission. Since 1994, he has been listed in “The Best Doctors in America”.

Dr. Lewitt is a Board-certified neurologist sub-specializing in movement disorders. He received his undergraduate and research training and medical degrees from Brown University and received additional post-graduate medical and research training from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine and the NIH.

Matthew Menza, M.D.

Matthew Menza, M.D., is Professor of Psychiatry and Neurology and the Interim Chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School .

Dr. Menza has been researching the psychiatric aspects of Parkinson’s disease (PD) for many years. He is widely regarded for his work on the nonmotor aspects of PD and has served on many National Institutes of Health (NIH) committees and study sections. He was the lead researcher on the NIH- sponsored trial of depression in people with PD, which was just completed. He is also the lead researcher on the first multi-center, controlled trial of insomnia in PD.

Dr. Menza is also an active researcher in general psychopharmacology. He conducts clinical psychopharmacology trials focused on anxiety, depression and sleep. He has written over 90 journal articles and book chapters. He co-edited, with Laura Marsh, M.D., of Johns Hopkins Medical School, a book on the nonmotor aspects of PD, entitled, Psychiatric Issues in Parkinson’s Disease: Practical Management. Dr. Menza is listed in Who’s Who in America and both the Castle Connolly Guide to the “Top Doctors in the New York Metro Area,” and New Jersey Monthly “Top Doctors in New Jersey”.

Dr. Menza received his medical degree from Temple University School of Medicine and performed his internship and residency in Psychiatry at the New York University Bellevue Medical Center. He also performed a fellowship in Psychosomatic Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School.

Ronald F. Pfeiffer, M.D.

Ronald F. Pfeiffer, M.D., is Professor and Vice Chair of the Department of Neurology at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. He joined the University of Tennessee in 1994 after spending many years on the faculty of the University of Nebraska Medical Center.

Dr. Pfeiffer’s area of specialization and research is Parkinson’s disease. He has extensive experience in clinical trials of experimental medications for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and has a particular interest in gastrointestinal dysfunction in Parkinson’s. Dr. Pfeiffer is a member of the Parkinson Study Group, the current Chairman of the Continuing Medical Education Committee of The Movement Disorder Society and a member of the Research Committee on Parkinsonism and Related Disorders of the World Federation of Neurology. He has been author or co-author of approximately 190 journal articles or book chapters and is co-editor of three books.

He received an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from Concordia University, Nebraska in 2001 and is currently a member of their Board of Regents as well as the Board of Directors of the Concordia University Foundation. He is also a member of the Board of Directors of Wheat Ridge Ministries.

Dr. Pfeiffer received a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He attended medical school at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and completed his internship and neurology residency training at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, DC.

Panelists

Doree Ann V. Espiritu, M.D.

Doree Ann V. Espiritu, M.D., is currently the Service Chief of Psychiatry of the Behavioral Health Services of the Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital.

Dr. Espiritu maintains an active practice seeing adult and geriatric patients in both outpatient and long-term care settings. She is a member of the Professional Advisory Board of the Michigan Parkinson Foundation and is also a member of the Area Agency on Aging State Advisory Council. Her special interests include issues in geriatric psychiatry, successful aging, wellness, spirituality in psychiatry and women’s health.

She is certified in both Adult and Geriatric Psychiatry. She completed her psychiatry residency in Adult Psychiatry at the Henry Ford Health System and then went on to complete a fellowship in Geriatric Psychiatry at Wayne State University.

Edwin B. George, M.D., Ph.D.

Edwin B. George, M.D., Ph.D., is Assistant Professor of Neurology at Wayne State University School of Medicine, where he is Director of the Movement Disorders Center at the University Health Center. He is also Director of the Movement Disorders Clinic at the John D. Dingell Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center.

Dr. George’s research interests include clinical management of Parkinson’s disease, tremor and dystonia, and he has been active in clinical trials of new medications for Parkinson’s disease and dystonia. He has authored more than 45 published reports and book chapters, and has served as a consultant to US and international pharmaceutical firms.

Dr. George is Chairman of the Professional Advisory Board of the Michigan Parkinson Foundation and serves on the Movement Disorders Strategic Planning Committee of the American Academy of Neurology.

Dr. George received his M.D. and Ph.D. in Pharmacology from Case Western Reserve University and performed his residency training in Neurology at the Johns Hopkins Hospital.

John L. Goudreau, D.O., Ph.D.

John L. Goudreau, D.O., Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Neurology and Ophthalmology, and Pharmacology and Toxicology and in the Neuroscience Program at Michigan State University (MSU). He is also the Director of the Translational Neurobiology Research Unit at MSU. The goal of Dr. Goudreau’s research program is to develop effective neuroprotective therapies for people living with Parkinson’s disease.

Dr. Goudreau serves on the Professional Advisory Board of the Michigan Parkinson Foundation and is an active member of the Parkinson Study Group, the American Academy of Neurology, The Movement Disorder Society, the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, and the Society for Neuroscience.

Dr. Goudreau is Board-certified in Neurology, and received his medical degree and doctorate in Neuropharmacology at Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine. He completed his residency in Neurology and a Movement Disorders Fellowship at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN.

The content and management of this symposium and webcast are under the exclusive direction of the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation and the Michigan Parkinson Foundation and are made possible by a generous unrestricted grant from UCB, Inc.